plastic 3D-printed tab that keeps a glass door closed

 At some point, Grand Design started including a horizontal glass door over the sound system and storage cubbies under the TV.  It’s a nice feature, but it use a thin plastic tab to keep the door shut while traveling.  I would have won the bet about it breaking the first year. 

So, it became time to apply our knowledge about 3D printing to solve this problem. I measured an oval that would be significantly deeper and used the classroom-friendly tinkercad.com to build a prototype.  It had a hole for the screw, was longer and wider than the original tab, and added a DSN for DoingSomethingNew.life of course. 

plastic 3D-printed tab that keeps a glass door closed
The prototype for our glass door closure tab.

The first print worked great! It’s not a polished product, since it was a prototype, but the long screw left by the original tab fits well in the hole and keeps enough pressure on the tab to keep it upright or down. I’ve since redesigned the tab as a more rectangular tab with rounded sides.  Both versions are only about 60mm long. 

I’m including the .stl file for those that have a 3D printer and want to start with something that already works fairly well.  Redesign and print something that works for you!

#DoSomethingNew! If you are new to 3D design, ‘kids’ from 8 to 88 can use the tutorials on Tinkercad.com to quickly learn basic 3D object design.  The learning and creating is all free! All you need after that is a friend or public library that has a 3D printer you can use.  

The ability to 3D print small plastic replacement parts is a tinkerer’s dream.  I already have my eyes on creating a snap-on cover for the motion-activated hallway light so that it can be covered and keep from waking the people who are sleeping on the couch pullouts. 

Want to print your own closure tab? Download the printable .stl file  or get a free copy from Thingiverse
Tinkercad.com tutorial for any age beginner 
– Browse some freely downloadable 3D designs using Thingiverse.com 

By DoingSomethingNew

I'm Howard, an educator for the last 27ish years. I'm a father, a husband, a Texan and a huge fan of creating.

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